Today’s news:

Nightmare on Clinton Avenue

for The Brooklyn Paper

A garage owner was brutally beaten — first with a baseball bat and a handgun, and later burned with a lighter — just as he was closing his Clinton Avenue parking lot for the night on July 15.

The man, whose garage is between Fulton Street and Atlantic Avenue, was overwhelmed by three men, who forced their way inside, shouting “Where’s the money?”

The trio beat the victim with the bat and gun, knocking him to the floor and binding his hands and legs with duct tape.

Next, they cut his back, burned his hand with a lighter, and poured gasoline on him — the precursor to an interrogation about where he lived and what he had in his house.

The brutality ended at 3:30 am, when the thugs left with an undisclosed amount of cash, his keys, and his wallet.

His problems didn’t even end there. By the time the victim freed himself from the duct tape and called cops, he was told that his Maywood, New Jersey home had already been burglarized, presumably by the same thugs who held him hostage.

Youth gone bad

Are the tween bandits back in action?

A trio of 14- to 16-year-old girls attacked a 15-year-old on July 19 as he approached his home on Navy Walk at around 8:30 pm.

The attack was eerily similar to a kiddie crime wave that was reported in these pages two months ago.

When the victim got near Tillary Street, the girls pounced, knocking him to the ground, kicking him in the face, and beating him with a blunt object. Their motivation was unclear, although the teen knew one of his attackers.

Hours later and a few blocks away, a similar attack occurred. On Park and North Portland avenues around 2 pm, a 16-year-old boy was walking home when three unknown teens grabbed him, beat him up, and took his cellphone before fleeing.

Collateral damage

A man who was standing on the corner of Grand and Flushing avenues at around 10 pm on July 19 was hit in the back of the head by a bullet fragment, cops said.

But further investigation revealed that the 34-year-old man was wanted on several warrants, so the cops arrested him.

Small-change

A man’s apartment was ransacked on July 16, but he didn’t have much worth taking.

The victim had left his Steuben Street building around 12:30 pm and came back two and a half hours later to find that the front door was broken and his apartment had been turned upside-down.

All he could find missing from the unit, which is near Park Avenue, was $5 in small change.

Live-in dispute

A woman beat her roommate senseless with a telephone during an argument inside their Tillary Street apartment on July 17.

According to cops, a 21-year-old woman beat a 53-year-old woman, sending her to the hospital with cuts on her head.

Cops later collared the suspect near their apartment, which is near Prince Street, and charged her with assault in the 1 pm attack.

Civic minded

A thief simply had to have a man’s 15-year-old Honda Civic.

The victim parked the red 1992 car on Carlton Avenue between Lafayette and Green avenues around 8 pm on July 16 — but when he came back at 9 the next morning, the Civic, with a Blue Book value of less than the value of a Blue Book, had vanished.

Self defense

A mugger picked the wrong person to try to rob on July 17.

The would-be victim was walking down Lexington Avenue near Classon Avenue around 3:30 when the robber sneaked up behind him and punched him in the face. The perp tried to grab the man’s cellphone, but despite the element of surprise and the mugger’s size — 6-foot-1, 210 pounds — the man was able to fight his assailant off, and the crook ran away empty-handed.

Cleaned out!

Burglars made off with $35,000 in cash, phone cards and smokes from a convenience store on July 17, cops said.

The owner of the store, which is on DeKalb and Vanderbilt avenues, discovered the dastardly deed when he showed up to open the store around 7 am the following morning. He found a mess: his cash register and ATM had both been busted open and $24,000 had been taken; nearly $7,000 in Metrocards and phone cards were gone; and $4,800 in cigarettes had been pilfered.

The thieves probably came in through the back wall, cops said.

Blue bandit

A monochromatic mararuader robbed a 43-year-old man at gunpoint on Clinton Street on July 9, police said.

The robber, dressed in blue and wielding a gun, pushed his victim onto the street near the corner of Mill Street, and pulled out his weapon at around 7 am. When a second man approached with a knife, the pedestrian gave up a money order worth $280.

Bad for health

Some people really don’t want their friends to smoke.

A woman who disapproved of her acquaintance buying cigarettes instead of spending the money on her kids took action on July 22. After the nicotine fiend bought pack around 5 pm at a bodega on Tillary Street near Prince Street, her friend hit her in the head with her car keys, causing injuries bad enough to send the victim to the hospital.

Cops picked up the non-smoking suspect and charged her with assault.

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