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Flatbush to get ‘narrow’ minded during arena construction

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The area around the new home of the Brooklyn Nets will be anything but a slam dunk for drivers next month as Flatbush Avenue will be narrowed to accommodate construction workers.

The six-lane road will be squeezed to five lanes between Atlantic Avenue and Dean Street, and the center track will run in the peak direction — towards the Manhattan Bridge during the morning rush, and away from it the rest of the day.

The new traffic pattern will go into effect on Aug. 1, and will remain in place until 2012, the Empire State Development Corporation said.

The lane is being eliminated to allow construction workers to move subway structures and make way for a new loading zone at the Barclays Center site, which is just southeast of the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic avenues.

ESDC spokeswoman Beth Mitchell said that traffic agents will be dispatched to make the three block lane loss as painless as possible.

“Traffic agents will be there as long as the [city] Department of Transportation determines they are necessary,” Mitchell said.

Expect those agents to keep busy. The area is constantly jammed, mostly due to car traffic, but congestion has also been exacerbated since the one-block portion of Fifth Avenue between Flatbush and Atlantic avenues was eliminated. That roadway was a key part of the B63 bus line. Now, Downtown-bound buses must turn from Fifth Avenue onto Flatbush Avenue and then block traffic as they wait to turn left at Atlantic Avenue.

But Mitchell said that buses won’t make traffic any worse once the Flatbush Avenue constriction goes into effect.

“The Department of Transportation did not foresee a significant impact to the traffic flow,” she said.

A southbound bus stop for the B41 and B67 will also be eliminated at Fifth Avenue as part of the construction.

Updated 1:01 pm, August 2, 2010: Turns out, the change in traffic pattern will not take place until Aug. 20, the Department of Transportation just told us.
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Reader Feedback

Joe Z. from Greenpoint says:
"NY is becoming more bike friendly - so there is no need for cars anymore. Not personal cars at least."

Really? Now, whose decision would that be, bike friendly citizens'? Move to a Third World country, like Sudan, if you have a problem with private ownership of automobiles. Do yourself and anyone else who reads this paper a big favor - stay away from keyboards.
July 27, 2010, 12:30 pm
Prop Joe from Bed Stuy says:
Yeah! What's bad fo' cars, Son, be good fo' me. Down with cars. Walk people.
July 27, 2010, 1:55 pm
Danny from Queens says:
Anyone driving in downtown Brooklyn during rush hour for non-business reasons is a masochist, and will probably enjoy sitting in traffic even more. Anyone driving on business can just add a 'traffic surcharge' to their billable time. Win-win for everyone!!!
July 28, 2010, 9:22 am
boof from brooklyn says:
Private ownership of cars is fine. It's the public sacrifice required to make the space to operate and store them that's the problem.
July 28, 2010, 10:07 am
Skunky from Downtown Brooklyn says:
Joe Z. you live in Greenpoint, and there are no subways there, so I understand you having a car. If you want everyone to own a car, move to Las Vegas or LA. See what a neighborhood looks like there If everyone in NYC owned a car we'd be really really screwed.
July 28, 2010, 11:23 am
Sid from Boerum hill says:
looks like a lot of people believe only the wealthy should own cars and have access to them. The Mayor skirted the laws in Bermuda that prohibit households from owning more than one car by buying a second house...
Cars are utilitarian and most of the people driving would happily use mass transit, if 1. it was available to them and 2. the schedules weren't being cut....and they aren't wealthy.
July 28, 2010, 12:16 pm
boof from brooklyn says:
Sid, I believe that all people should have cars. The city should buy two cars for each family/household. Then they should take as many properties by eminent domain as necessary to build all the garages needed to store all of these cars. Then they should take as many more properties as needed to provide highways and streets for all of these new cars to drive. Perhaps the Feds can be persuaded to just nuke the city so we can get a quick start on on of this new construction.

People who want to live in an actual city with actual urban things like walking and public transportation can, like, go to Europe or something.
Aug. 2, 2010, 11:18 am
Joe Cilento from Long island says:
Canarsie high school is employing an ex fraudulant attorney by the name of David Jampol. He was dis barred from the suffolk county bar association on long island and terminated from Northport high school once they learned it was his clients money that paid for his college education as a teacher. I am one of many victims and am wondering what canarsie high school who employs Mr. Jampol is going to do about it? He does not deserve to be an educator since the money that paid for his education was Stolen money and he ruined my lawsuit that i retained him for. What is the principal and superintendent going to do???? Please feel free to email about this story which i hope makes your paper. joeaces1@hotmail.com
Aug. 20, 2013, 4:11 pm

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