Sections

Children’s crusade! School kids aiming guns to slow down speeders on Atlantic Ave

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

They say that kids shouldn’t play with guns, but students at PS 261 are using them to save their own lives.

The kids — who must cross Atlantic Avenue to get to their school at Pacific and Hoyt streets — have been using a radar gun to clock speeders on the so-called “Avenue of Death,” where nine pedestrians were killed by cars between 2006 and 2008, and almost 600 accidents on the stretch between Flatbush Avenue and the river between 2005 and 2006 (more current stats are on the way from the city).

The kids’ smoking gun? The average car zooms through at 38 miles per hour — eight miles per hour over the speed limit.

The students’ road work is partly a photo-op organized by the Department of Transportation as part of a larger enforcement effort and a lobbying campaign to eventually reduce the speed limit near schools to 20–25 mph.

Kids have quickly learned what adults (well, some of them) know intuitively: speeding near schools is dangerous.

“A lot of bad things happen at this intersection — we even saw someone go through at 50 miles per hour!” said 10-year-old Emanual Lopez, who joined his classmates and city officials at the intersection this week to call for stricter enforcement. “Drivers don’t pay attention, because they’re texting. They don’t realize that we walk across every day.”

Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan — on hand for the Tuesday photo-op — touted her agency’s plan to install 1,500 countdown signals to decrease traffic fatalities citywide.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Dave from Clinton Hill says:
Excellent stuff
Nov. 19, 2010, 9:04 pm
Marty from Borough Hall says:
I question the validity of their report. I bet they've supported the concept of not getting run over on their way to school since day one. And they have no regard for anyone who would be adversely affected, like people who can't be inconvenienced by obeying the speed limit, and morticians who would be deprived of business. Making these streets safer by slowing down cars will only cause more noise from car-honking, more pollution from traffic jams and more frustration to residents and visitors alike.

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/33/32/dtg_ppwbikelane_2010_08_06_bk.html
Nov. 20, 2010, 9:31 am
ta from bike nation says:
Car owners need to be rounded up, and put in jail for life.
Nov. 20, 2010, 10:35 am
Joe Z. from Greenpoint says:
Leave it to Zip Mills (P.S. 261 principal) to stage some useless symbolic gesture nonsense like this. The real question is why there isn't a crossing guard at the intersection of Atlantic and Hoyt. I guess the guard presently located at Pacific and Hoyt would actually have to perform her duties (walking more than 20 feet) instead of yapping on her cell phone.
Nov. 23, 2010, 7:10 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

This week’s featured advertisers