Today’s news:

It’s a fire sale to save the City Reliquary

Community Newspaper Group

The storefront museum that celebrates Brooklyn’s underdog spirit with exacting curatorial detail and a passionate devotion to artifacts large and small may be in danger of closing.

The Williamsburg-based City Reliquary Museum, which has featured exhibits such as “Miss Subways Past and Present” and hosted events including the Miss G Train pageant, Bicycle Fetish Day, and the Havemeyer Sugar Sweets Festival, needs $60,000 or else it will shut.

City Reliquary founder Dave Herman sent a personal appeal to friends and supporters on Jan. 24 to inform them of the museum’s financial situation. In the letter, Herman characterized the moment as “a scary, yet decisive, turning point” in the museum’s history.

“For the four years since opening our public museum, we have managed to tread water just enough to pay the rent from one month to the next,” wrote Herman. “However, we have finally come to the point when this is no longer possible.”

In its last-ditch effort, the museum is pushing forward with an aggressive fundraising drive, coinciding with a brand new exhibit, “Company Journals of the Southside Firehouse,” curated by Firefighter Pat D’Emic of Williamsburg’s Hook & Ladder Company 104.

The museum’s goal is to raise $20,000 by March 31, which will cover the cost of a part-time assistant. To start, the museum is hosting a benefit concert and “fire sale” at the Knitting Factory on Feb. 18, which will feature a date auction with genuine, in the flesh, New York City firefighters.

“It’s a real-life opportunity to take one of New York’s Bravest out on the town for a night of romance and adventure,” the museum said in its announcement of the fundraiser. “Who knows? They might let you taste their three-alarm chili!”

There will also be a benefit show on St. Patrick’s Day on March 17.

Herman acknowledges that raising tens of thousands of dollars during an economic recession is an uphill battle, but he believes that a museum that “celebrates the city we love” is worth saving.

“It is the living embodiment of our local heritage and hometown pride,” he said. “Losing the City Reliquary would mean not only losing a unique contribution of and for the people of the city, but also the many memories and artifacts of similar unsung landmarks which this museum presents.”

City Reliquary “Fire Sale” fundraiser is on Feb. 18 at 6 pm at The Knitting Factory [361 Metropolitan Ave. at Havemeyer Street in Williamsburg, (347) 529-6696] Tickets are $20. For info, visit www.cityreliquary.org/category/events.

Pin It
Print this story Permalink

Reader Feedback

John from Westminster Road says:
I hope this museum stays open, particulary since Brooklyn is decidely under-museumed. Perhaps it could morph into a full-scaled folk arts museum and gain the support of that community.
Feb. 2, 2010, 11:16 am
lance Bruce from Gayton says:
Ooh, very nice. Are any of the firefighters homosexual?
Feb. 2, 2010, 6:11 pm
lance Bruce from Gayton says:
Oh Gersh - you are saucy little tramp!
Feb. 8, 2010, 3:34 am

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Links