Today’s news:

All aboard! G train gaining more riders than any line citywide

The Brooklyn Paper

The G train is on a roll, with its surging ridership growing faster than any other line citywide.

The little green line that never suffers the indignity of entering Manhattan gained nearly 2,000 riders per weekday in 2012, a passenger increase of 4.2 percent that dwarfs all other routes, according to new Metropolitan Transportation Authority statistics.

Riders of the so-called Brooklyn Local say the data proves service increases are necessary along the line, where commuters recently won a hard-fought battle to make a five-stop extension in Park Slope, Windsor, Terrace, and Kensington permanent.

“The MTA’s new numbers show what G train riders already know. These trains are overcrowded,” said John Raskin, head of straphanger advocacy group Riders Alliance. “We need more of them.”

The G now offers one-seat service between North and Brownstone Brooklyns — but at a price, according to frequent rider Alexis Saba.

“It can be really crowded when the service is irregular, and that happens a lot,” said Saba, who lives off the Clinton-Washington stop.

Last year, complaints about long waits, crowded trains, and poor signage grew louder than a subway car with the window open as commuters, activist groups including the Riders Alliance, and politicians demanded improvements on the G line.

The MTA initially said service was fine and low ridership on the line did not warrant any changes, but in January the agency reversed course and said it would consider G line alterations. In Feb.,authorities launched a line review, intended to be completed by this summer.

MTA spokesman Kevin Ortiz said the agency will consider the growing ridership — but only so much.

“We will of course use the latest ridership figures as we assess G line service, but total ridership is only one of the elements we use to determine levels of service,” said Ortiz. “The last time we looked at ridership trends, the level of service on the G was sufficient, but we will continue to analyze.”

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.

Pin It
Print this story Permalink

Reader Feedback

Joshua Ness from Bed-Stuy says:
The level of G service is sufficient when it runs on time. That should have been the caveat. And how about adding one more car? I'm tired of running.
April 12, 2013, 5:49 am
Joshua Ness from Bed-Stuy says:
The level of G service is sufficient when it runs on time. That should have been the caveat. And how about adding one more car? I'm tired of running.
April 12, 2013, 5:49 am
Ben from Upper East Side says:
Ex-Greenpointer here: G Train, so glad I don't have to take that misereable excuse for a train anymore!
April 12, 2013, 10:36 am
BunnynSunny from Clinton Hill says:
Notice that ridership decreased in 2012 from 2011 at the Clinton Washington subway station because the morning commute is such a horrible experience (infrequent trains, packed like sardines trains) that people have found alternative ways to get in to Manhattan. I now take the C. To hell with the G, stands for Goddamned.
April 12, 2013, 10:40 am
BunnynSunny from Clinton Hill says:
Notice that ridership decreased in 2012 from 2011 at the Clinton Washington subway station because the morning commute is such a horrible experience (infrequent trains, packed like sardines trains) that people have found alternative ways to get in to Manhattan. I now take the C. To hell with the G, stands for Goddamned.
April 12, 2013, 10:40 am
diehipster from Slicing Seths says:
There is no need to enhance the G train in any way. The answer is simply to destroy all the hipsters who are clogging it. It is now gaining the ridership of Zanes with massive backpacks; Megans with bags of art supplies; Joshes with bags of Whole Foods organic groceries, etc.

All these people I've mentioned are just making a pit stop in Brooklyn; they will chant "BETTER G TRAIN SERVICE, NOW!!!!" Yet, they will be gone in a couple of year to the next kewel city - making complaints for a better yupster life over there.
April 12, 2013, 1:18 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
diehipster keeps making violent threats from behind a computer when in reality he's obviously some 36 year old reject living in your grandma's basement. You probably even need help opening a jar of pickles. What a complete joke you are.
April 12, 2013, 1:39 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
I say that the money that is being used to make the bike lane on the VNB by diverted to help with the G train on making it better, and it will probably be a better use since it will be used more than a bike path that will hardly ever go used.
April 12, 2013, 6:03 pm
Why Tal Get A Life from In Pleasantville says:
Nobody cares what you say, Tal. Or you, diehipster. Or even Ty from wherever.
Tiny people with big mouths!
April 15, 2013, 12:54 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
To answer to Mr. Idon'tuesaconsistantnamewhenIcommenteventhoughIamprobablythatverysameperson, the MTA has been a state agency since 1965 and I do pay taxes to them, therefore I do have a say in what goes on since it's my money going to them as well.
April 15, 2013, 6:20 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal
How much money has been spend on the VNB Bike lane? $0

So go away and leave us alone.
April 16, 2013, 6:12 am
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

You have a completely uninformed opinion. Not "a say"
April 16, 2013, 7:29 am
Peter from Cobble Hill says:
interloper and all those responses to Tal (must be the same guy/gal), it seems you have far too much time on your hands. Every time I take a break at work and read some article on this site I see your comments. You must be some barista-Beardo tool. no one cares what a transplant from the midwest has to say. Except other yupster/hipster idiots such as yourself. Tal seems like he actually has some wisdom to impart, if you'll just listen, and that diehipster fellow if just plain funny. So, please stop commenting on Everything, please sir give it a rest.
April 16, 2013, 3:57 pm
Print Reader from Brooklyn says:
Get the print edition of The Brooklyn Paper and you have a better reading experience without the worthless comments.
April 16, 2013, 4:40 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Other Michael, that bike path hasn't even been approved or even underway, so of course no money has been spent on that yet.
April 16, 2013, 6:37 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
That's right, Tal.

So why do you want to divert money from that project. "I say that the money that is being used to make the bike lane on the VNB by diverted to help with the G train on making it better,"
April 16, 2013, 8:07 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
However, that would be more useful than that meaningless bike bath, which will just be a vision at best.
April 16, 2013, 9:46 pm
ty from pps says:
"Tal seems like he actually has some wisdom to impart..."

Hahahahahaahahahahahaaahaa!
April 16, 2013, 11:36 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

Admiringly, it is really unlikely that the VNB bike lane will ever happen. But the effort to have it made is bringing to fact to light.

1. How shortsighted it is to build a bridge that only carries cars. Hello, people who are planning the replacement for the Tapan Zee.
2. That people who travel by bike need to get across the VZB. Maybe it is about time to figure out a way for that to happen.
April 17, 2013, 8:03 am
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Other Michael, I would rather the MTA spends money on what is used more, not less. Subway lines are used more, so they are worth the money especially the Second Avenue Subway, which will really give relief to Lexington Avenue Line Local otherwise known as the 6 train, though I'm not much of a fan of the extension of the 7 past Penn Station let alone extend that to NJ. Of course the G could use some help as well. However, this is not a cheap process, and I feel that raising the base fare would help give into that especially since it's you guys are going to be using it more rather than demanding for more subsidies from those such as myself who use it less. Again, I do have a say on the MTA, because they are a state-owned agency and I do pay taxes to them as well. As for the TZB, it's most likely that the new bridge won't be built with a train on it, which is mainly due to cost and the fact that there isn't much there for one to be worth the money, though I find the idea of Cap'n Transit to just tear it all down and build nothing new to be nothing more than a bad idea, because it will create chaos on how to cross the Hudson River between the two counties by either packing the ferries or the other bridges when this one is used a lot daily.
April 17, 2013, 5:58 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
If the MTA spends money where things are used less, then they will get used more.

When they built the VZN Bridge Staten Island was only farms and country houses. By your way of thinking the MTA should never have built it because the ferries were not at capacity.
April 17, 2013, 6:57 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
Other Michael, this is not the movie Field of Dreams, this is real life. Many won't come just because you build it. In reality, it will works if there is a demand for it. The reason that bridge was built was to actually give the island direct vehicular connection to the rest of the city and even state, which didn't exist before. Let's not forget the real reason the subway was built in the first place and that was to get entire masses to move around a city faster especially when it came to long distances, and that was by a demand, not just to have for the fun of it. Nevertheless, the MTA does actually make more of a profit from the tolls on the crossing than they do from the fares on either the subways, buses, or even commuter rails and buses.
April 18, 2013, 5:49 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

Did you know that when they extended the Subway to southern Brooklyn, Queens and most of The Bronx it was just farmland. People moved there after it was build. The masses were not there. They moved there after the subway was build. Just like people moved to Staten Island after the VZB was built.

Go away Tal. You don't know what you are talking about.
April 18, 2013, 9:01 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

Did you know that when they extended the Subway to southern Brooklyn, Queens and most of The Bronx it was just farmland. People moved there after it was build. The masses were not there. They moved there after the subway was build. Just like people moved to Staten Island after the VZB was built.

Go away Tal. You don't know what you are talking about.
April 18, 2013, 9:02 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
Tal

Did you know that when they extended the Subway to southern Brooklyn, Queens and most of The Bronx it was just farmland. People moved there after it was build. The masses were not there. They moved there after the subway was build. Just like people moved to Staten Island after the VZB was built.

Go away Tal. You don't know what you are talking about.
April 18, 2013, 9:03 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
First of all, did you really need to say that three times? Nevertheless, my point is that most of the funding for the MTA comes from residents actually living in the parts of downstate NY that are hardly served by mass transit, especially from the tolls of their crossings. Their biggest profits come from both the TZ/VN Bridges for being the highest in tolls. Whenever there is a call to improve transit, it's us motorists who come to foot the bill with tolls even higher than before, and those hikes aren't raised in quarters like the MTA fares. The idea by Albaneese to place tolls on the East River crossings isn't even something new, and I was questioning on what Ravitch meant when he said it was part of the Rescue Plan, because I didn't feel rescued by that idea. Compared to major European cities, the subway fare is actually a bargain when looking at what they are charging. Before you say that they move much better, keep in mind that they hiked the fares in order to get there, which should be the same here, rather than place the burden on another group and giving them the royal screw job.
April 19, 2013, 5:28 pm
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
and everyone who takes mass transit instead of driving makes it possible for you to drive.
April 21, 2013, 5:48 am
Other Michael from Park Slope says:
and Tal

There is a reason tolls pay for mass transit. Because the New Your State Sales tax that non car owning NYC residents pay is used to pay for the roads that they to not drive on.
April 21, 2013, 5:17 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Links